The Christian Almanac (Book Review)

christian-almanacGeorge Grant and Gregory Wilbur have written a fun book. The Christian Almanac is a little bit of a devotional, a “this day in history” reader, a “Bartlett’s” quotations, a worldwide national holiday and Christian liturgical feast calendar, and a Bible reading schedule. It is not a thoroughly “Christian” almanac in the sense that every event named and celebrated is somehow connected to the Bible or Christianity. The authors, who both seem to be southern heritage American Christians (they give themselves away every time they refer to the U.S. Civil War as “the uncivil War Between the States”–come on guys, please acquiesce to the accepted definition of the term “civil war“!), write about American history, Christian history, literature and poetry, and the various arts (pictorial, performing, etc).

While not suitable as a daily “Christian” devotional because it frequently chronicles aspects of history that are not explicitly Christian, I daily found myself enriched with a new perspective on life while reading the two pages allotted for each day. I can image the Christian Almanac being used by teachers in all types of schools (public, private, home) for a “history lesson of the day” curriculum segment. For preachers, speakers, and other educators, this book could serve as a rich resource for anecdotes, illustrations, and life-lessons. For this end I have compiled a Topical Index for locating essays and short vignettes that fit a particular category of topic.

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